MANDELA GHOST FAILS TO SAVE NEGROES

Even though he is finally dead, The Ghost of Necklace Mandela has failed to save Negroes.

France rushed in to take over Mandela's role and cover up his failure.

Thousands seek refuge at Central African airport

By Krista Larson and Lori Hinnant
Associated Press
December 6, 2013

BANGUI, Central African Republic (AP) — Thousands of Christian civilians sought refuge at an airport guarded by French soldiers Friday, fleeing from the mostly Muslim ex-rebels with machetes and guns who rule the country a day after the worst violence to hit the chaotic capital in nine months.

When several French helicopters landed at the airport, people sang with joy as they banged on plastic buckets and waved rags into the air in celebration.

Outside the barbed wire fences of the airport, bodies lay decomposing along the roads in a capital too dangerous for many to collect the corpses. Thursday's clashes left at least 280 dead, according to national radio, and have raised fears that waves of retaliatory attacks could soon follow.

"They are slaughtering us like chickens," said Appolinaire Donoboy, a Christian whose family remained in hiding.

France had pledged to increase its presence in its former colony well before Christian militias attacked the capital at dawn Thursday. The arrival of additional French troops and equipment came as the capital teetered on the brink of total anarchy and represented the greatest hope for many Central Africans.

About 1,000 French forces were expected to be on the ground by Friday evening, a French defense official said on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

As night fell across the near anarchic capital, Christians fearing retaliatory attacks by the mostly Muslim ex-rebels crowded as close to the runway as possible, laying out their woven mats in front of a barbed wire coiled fence. National radio announced that at least 280 people had died, citing figures from local Red Cross officials.

The U.S. State Department said it was "deeply concerned" by the violence and praised France's quick intervention.

France signaled its amped up presence in its former colony on Friday by sending out armored vehicles to patrol the streets. A French fighter jet made several flyovers, roaring through the sky over an otherwise lifeless capital as civilians cowered at home. Britain also flew in a C-17 plane Friday loaded with equipment to help with France's intervention.

As many as 250 French troops are carrying out permanent patrols in Bangui, and "we didn't notice any direct clashes between armed groups today," said French military spokesman Col. Gilles Jaron in Paris.

On Thursday, however, 10 armed attackers in a pickup truck fired on a French position at the airport, including with a rocket-propelled grenade whose charge did not detonate. French forces returned fire, killing four attackers and wounding six, Jaron said.

A planned vote on a U.N. Security Council resolution Thursday allowed France to proceed with its mission. It coincided with the worst violence to roil the capital since March when the mostly Muslim rebels known as Seleka overthrew the president of a decade.

On Thursday, Christian militias believed to be loyal to ousted leader Francois Bozize attacked the city, and hours of gunbattles ensued. The conflict in one of Africa's poorest countries has gathered little sustained international attention since the government overthrow in March, and the dramatic developments were overshadowed Friday by global mourning for South African anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela, who died at the age of 95.

"Thanks to France and the United Nations who want to save the Central Africans, soon the Seleka attacks on civilians will stop. We have had enough of Seleka killing, raping and stealing," said Abel Nguerefara, who lives on the outskirts of Bangui.

Streets in the city were empty Friday except for military vehicles and the trucks favored by the rebel forces who now claim control of the government. Nine unclaimed bodies lay sprawled in front of the parliament building alone — local Red Cross workers didn't dare retrieve them, or other bodies that were left to decay outside.

Despite the cheers that went up when a jet engine roared overhead, France insisted it was going only reluctantly into Central African Republic and with the limited aim of doubling its presence in the country to 1,200 troops.

Still, it remains an open question how France can achieve even its limited goals in the six months allotted to the mission.

"There's a big gap between the vision France has of itself as a global power and as a power that can intervene," said Aline Leboeuf, a security and development specialist at the French Institute for International Relations.

The real question, she added, is: "Can you intervene in the right way and when do you leave?"

Rebel leader-turned-president Michel Djotodia appealed for calm, even as his residence and that of the prime minister were looted and vandalized by the fighters Thursday. He announced a dusk-to-dawn curfew in hopes of preventing retaliatory violence against Christians from Muslims.

In a speech broadcast Thursday in the Sango language and a television interview in French, Djotodia called on people to realize that French forces were not in Central African Republic to take sides in an increasingly sectarian conflict.

Djotodia, who is Muslim, unified rebel groups in the country's mostly Muslim north, where resentment of the federal government and a sense of disenfranchisement has been rife for years. Yet once those rebels were unleashed upon the capital, he wielded very little control over the mix of bush fighters, child soldiers and foreign mercenaries he had recruited.

Supporters of the ousted president formed self-defense militias such as those behind Thursday's attack, which came hours before the U.N. Security Council voted to authorize the French deployment.

"We're appreciative of France, but we know that 50 years after our independences, France is again required to come in as a fireman to save us — it's not right," said Alpha Conde, president of Guinea. "It's a humiliation for Africa that 50 years afterward, we are not at all able to manage our problems ourselves."

[Not at all. Not at all. Even The Ghost of Mandela can't do its voodoo.]

France's military, which controls Bangui airport, said about 2,000 Central Africans took refuge there Thursday, most if not all of them Christian. The crowd swelled on Friday.

"France must [MUST] come and rapidly deploy and do everything possible to save us," he told the AP on Friday.

He's not sure whether he can go back and live among Muslims. Too much has happened. Too many attacks by the Seleka, which include foreign mercenaries among their ranks.

"We are angry," he said through the fence keeping civilians away from the airport runway. "The Muslims should go back where they came from."

___

Lori Hinnant reported from Paris. Associated Press writers Jose Richard Pouambi in Bangui, Central African Republic; Jamey Keaten, Elaine Ganley and Sylvie Corbet in Paris; and Cassandra Vinograd in London contributed to this report.

Comments

Chris: The UN should outlaw Islam for the protection of humankind. It teaches the wrong lesson. It is a violent religion that is allowed to spread around the wrong without anyone doing anything. This is Hitler in another form.

[Yeah, the talmudic UN, with 50+ majority-Muz members, and with significant protected-class Muz minorities in each Security Council Permanent Member state, is going to outlaw the talmudic filth that is Islam (or Hitler, as this idiot prefers to call it.).]

JON B: A dilemma for the Obama Clown Posse. Millions of potential national socialist voters to place in malcontent areas like Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, etc. BUT....they are Christians. We know the OCP hates Christians so what to do?

[Yeah, Negro "national socialist voters" for Obongo.]

What Recession?: Has anyone thought about giving the Christians guns (and ammunition) to defend themselves?

[Yeah, give an African a bullet and he can throw it at a fish, but give him an AK-47 and he'll be able to smash the fish's head in with the butt.]

SeekTheTruth: When Is it Time to Arm the Christian Militia. Their men need to fight back and secure the country. We need to immediately prepare them to fight.

Autoamerican: Oh look - - yet another country in which the West has relinquished control to the natives, only to have it fall into utter chaos and despair, and be taken over by violent Muslims.

[Kike Agenda in action.]

SeekTheTruth: Our remaining lives will be fighting Islam.

[And Muzzies' Kike protectors too of course.]

Walter: "It's a humiliation for Africa that 50 years afterward, we are not at all able to manage our problems ourselves." -- It's not politically correct to say, but the said truth is that many third world countries were NOT ready for independence when it was granted to them.

Post a comment

Private comment

Profile

卍心の智

Author:卍心の智

Search form
Latest Journals
Latest comments
Monthly archive
Friend Request Form

Want to be friends with this user.

Link