HERE COMES THE ACEL











DESIRE AS

奇麗で超越的な英語を話すことを望む人々のため


DESIRE AS

I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them.

They were the best times, the harvest years, with jam to lace the bread; so goodness, goodness knows why I'd throw it to the birds; but there it is, and there we are; and all I ever want to be is far from the eyes that ask me in whose bed you're gonna be, and is it true you only see Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind?

Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . It's perfect as it stands, so why then crush it in your perfect hands? . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them.

So tell me, you must have thought it all out in advance; or, goodness, goodness knows why you'd throw it to the birds. You mock the good things; you play the heart strings, play them one by one; but there it is, and there we are; and all I ever want to be is far from the eyes that ask me in whose bed you're gonna be, and is it true you only see Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind?

It's perfect as it stands, so why then crush it in your perfect hands? . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . In whose bed you gonna be and is it true you only see Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. . . . It's perfect as it stands, so why then crush it in your perfect hands? . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind?

I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . I've got six things on my mind. You're no longer one of them. . . . Desire as a sylph-figured creature who changes her mind? . . . It's perfect as it stands, so why then crush it in your perfect hands?

Paddy McAloon, 1985



Our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ:

With desire I have desired to eat this pasch with you, before I suffer. われ苦難の前に、なんぢらと共にこの過越の食をなすことを望みに望みたり。





Paddy McAloon 80s

Paddy McAloon 21st Century

Paddy McAloon Prefab Sprout Steve McQueen


Desire As

Tuning: Down one-half step

Gmaj7                      Bm            A              Em7
I've got six things on my mind you're no longer one of them
  Gmaj7                  Bm                         A     Em7
Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?

            Gmaj7            Bm                A/d     Bm       A
They were the best times, the harvest years with jam to lace the bread
  Em7       Hm              A/d     Hm     A
So goodness, goodness knows why I'd throw it to the birds
    Em7    Gmaj7  A         Gmaj7      
But there it is,    and there   we are
   A                        Bm                     Gmaj7  F#
And all I ever want to be is far from the eyes that ask    me
      
D                Bm      Gmaj7           C      H7
In whose bed you  gonna be and is it true you  only see
  Gmaj7                   Bm                       A      Em7
Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
            Gmaj7       Bm             A              Em7      
It's perfect as it stands  so why then crush it in your perfect hands ?

Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
I've got six things on my mind you're no longer one of them

  Gmaj7       Bm                   A/d     Bm    A    
So tell me you must have thought it all out in advance
  Em7       Bm                       A/d      Bm     A  
Or goodness, goodness knows why you'd throw it to the birds
          Em7              Bm                      A/d       Bm      A
You mock the good things, you play the heart strings, play them one by one
   Em7       Gmaj7   A         Gmaj7      
But there it is,       and there we are
  A     Bm                     Gmaj7  F#
And all I ever want to be is far from the eyes that ask    me
      
D                Bm      Gmaj7          C      B7
In whose bed you gonna be and is it true you  only see
      
Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
It's perfect as it stands so why then crush it in your perfect hands ?

Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
In whose bed you gonna be and is it true you only see
Desire as a sylph figured creature who changes her mind ?
      
I've got six things on my mind you're no longer one of them





Paddy McAloon: Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards
Wendy Smith: Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards
Martin McAloon: Bass guitar
Neil Conti: Percussion

MEMPHIS 1969.01.23 04:00~07:00



American Sound Studio
827 Thomas Street
Memphis
Tennessee
1969.01.23
04:00~07:00

SOUL DRIFTER


Soul Drifter

By Lindsey Buckingham, 1992


I'm a soul drifter
And I'm out of this town
Ain't no use hangin?'round
You see
My heart was broken
My part was spoken
Now the ground has opened
All around me

I'm a soul lifter
And it's out of my hands
So it's off to other lands
You see
It's a new dawn
So it's so long
For the soul lifter
The soul drifter
That's me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEm_PzChAy4&t=5m07s





L.B., B.L., 2012.05.06

DEATH

And Death Shall Have No Dominion

Dylan Thomas


And death shall have no dominion.
Dead man naked they shall be one
With the man in the wind and the west moon;
When their bones are picked clean and the clean bones gone,
They shall have stars at elbow and foot;
Though they go mad they shall be sane,
Though they sink through the sea they shall rise again;
Though lovers be lost love shall not;
And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.
Under the windings of the sea
They lying long shall not die windily;
Twisting on racks when sinews give way,
Strapped to a wheel, yet they shall not break;
Faith in their hands shall snap in two,
And the unicorn evils run them through;
Split all ends up they shan't crack;
And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.
No more may gulls cry at their ears
Or waves break loud on the seashores;
Where blew a flower may a flower no more
Lift its head to the blows of the rain;
Though they be mad and dead as nails,
Heads of the characters hammer through daisies;
Break in the sun till the sun breaks down,
And death shall have no dominion.



"WE'RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER"

Jewgle We're all in this together

KRAFFT'S SULLIED ART ?

When a Good Artist Turns Nazi Sympathizer

By Phil CampbellWriter, author

The Huffington Post, 02/15/2013


Tags: Art , Charles Krafft , The Holocaust , Charles Krafft Nazi , Death , Irony , Nazis , Scandal , Arts News

My head's still spinning from this story, and I'm barely (if that) connected to any of it. Those at the center of this art world controversy have got to be feeling something more akin to a horse-kick to the stomach.

Are you familiar with the work of Charles Krafft? An artist from the Pacific Northwest, Krafft was known, among other things, for taking human remains -- cremains -- and turning them into a kind of porcelain art. For two decades or more Krafft has managed to be a living legend in Seattle and an iconoclast bad boy who mocked the art world even as he profited from it.

Among Krafft's work is "Disasterware," a series of ceramic plates that derided the sort of sentimental plates your taste-deficient grandmother might display on the walls of her kitchen. Instead of pastoral scenes and calm vistas, "Disasterware" included imagery of Nazis and other violent, disturbing images.

In another series, "Forgiveness," Krafft made replica soap and perfume bottles inlaid with Nazi swastikas.

The idea driving this kind of art, it was agreed, was that Krafft was a provocateur taking on some of the most difficult themes in art -- death, violence, Nazis, and the Holocaust -- with a sly, shifting lens of irony, scorn, and humor. This is all well and good in a post-modern way, but to make this kind of art has always meant that Krafft's acceptance as an artist rested on the belief that he held personal political views that were generally in line with the rest of the art world, i.e. anti-fascist and liberally tolerant. No one ever considered the possibility that Krafft's more controversial works of art were in any way, well, sincere.

That all changed this week when Jen Graves, a staff writer at The Stranger in Seattle, revealed Krafft's awful secret: He is an admitted White Nationalist and a Holocaust denier:

On July 28, 2012, he participated (not for the first time) in a podcast produced by the white nationalist website The White Network, whose tagline is 'Whites Talking to Whites About White Interests.' According to The White Network's "about" page, "We recognize that different races and ethnic groups cannot live together in peace on the same soil, that Whites cannot and should not tolerate being governed by non-Whites." The description goes on to say: "Jews are not White. They are obsessed with their own group's best interests, not ours. Our network is and will always remain by, for, and about the best interests of Whites, and only Whites. We are uncompromising on this point. We do not hesitate to identify and criticize Jews and will not allow them to hide amongst us."

"On the podcast, Krafft says, "I believe the Holocaust is a myth," and that the myth is "being used to promote multiculturalism and globalism.""

I quote Graves at length because she, in fact, bothered to google Krafft when others did not. Headline aside, her story in The Stranger, a publication which sees itself as iconoclastic in its own way, treats the Krafft revelations with meticulous care; we thought Krafft was one of us, her story's subtext reads, but we are heartbroken to learn that he is most definitely not.

Consider the truly troubling anecdote at the heart of Graves' story, that of the Jewish collector who bought an eerie bust of Hitler that Krafft had made, fully believing that Krafft's message in the bust was an anti-fascist one. The collector died before ever learning of Krafft's real views, but Graves was assured by Timothy Burgard, a curator in San Francisco, that, had the collector known of Krafft's warped ideology, "he'd probably have smashed it."

No kidding. I might sardonically laugh to myself at the idea of some shallow, profiteering art collector who bought this art thinking it was a hot property, only to fret about that investment evaporating with these scandalous revelations. But I have a really hard time feeling anything but sympathy, sadness, and anger for the Jewish collector who was conned; I feel that way even though the man didn't live long enough to learn that he was actually the butt of a very sadistic joke.

As I said, my own connection to all of this is tangential at best, but when I was living in Seattle I was sorely tempted to buy one of Krafft's porcelain hand grenades. Those hand grenades, mostly white with some delicate blue floral images on them, are beautiful in their own right, and I was convinced that Krafft's was provocatively suggesting through the grenades that we as a species are so violent that our minds can be tricked into believing that something so violent could be made beautiful. The violence can be found in the very dust of our cremains (he also makes, surprise, porcelain Lugers, a handgun favored by Germans during World War II).

Now, having learned of his views on the Holocaust and his thoughts on Aryan supremacy, what do those grenades really mean? I shudder at the implications, and in retrospect am very glad that I spent my money on books instead.

In 2003 I attended the opening of a performance-exhibition of Krafft's. I was with my wife Emily Hall, who was writing an arts piece about it for The Stranger. Instead of the usual art gallery, the show was held at a columbarium in Seattle's Mount Pleasant Cemetery. No Nazi symbols were on display, nothing so polarizing or so cruel. Krafft instead brought out his sense of humor and irony with objects like a cremains bulldog and a cremains bottle of Absolut -- to quote Hall, the Absolut bottle was "created for and of someone who died of liver disease (a commission, it turns out, from his friends)."

A former Catholic, I was at once delighted and moved by the strangely irreverent reverence in Krafft's art that day in the cemetery. I think everyone else who attended the opening that afternoon was. For me, Krafft had thrown open a door to the liberating idea that death didn't have to be so stuffy or so ceremonial. Death just is, so why not have some fun with it?

I'm trying to write an ending to this post, and I just can't. I can't make sense of any of it. We should be able to judge art apart from the personal politics of the artist, but Krafft's work doesn't allow for that, especially when he worked with human remains to make art. We literally trusted him with our bodies, and the idea that his intentions about all of it -- the entire corpus -- were not entirely pure corrupts everything, past the ashes of our bones and into our very souls.





In My Craft or Sullen Art

By Dylan Thomas


In my craft or sullen art
Exercised in the still night
When only the moon rages
And the lovers lie abed
With all their griefs in their arms,
I labour by singing light
Not for ambition or bread
Or the strut and trade of charms
On the ivory stages
But for the common wages
Of their most secret heart.

Not for the proud man apart
From the raging moon I write
On these spindrift pages
Nor for the towering dead
With their nightingales and psalms
But for the lovers, their arms
Round the griefs of the ages,
Who pay no praise or wages
Nor heed my craft or art.

KIKE-INFESTED IRELAND > IRB > NAMA

2013.02.06 :

"The Dáil is to sit late tonight to deal with emergency legislation to liquidate the Irish Bank Resolution Corporation – transferring its assets to the National Asset Management Agency."

http://www.thejournal.ie/ibrc-emergency-legislation-dail-785250-Feb2013/



2009.09.01 :

"The Irish government has appointed investment bank Rothschild to advise on the restructuring of the country's banking sector, a source close to the firm said on Tuesday. 'We will advise the Department of Finance on how to shape the banking system going forward, including the establishment of the National Asset Management Agency and any possible consolidation in the sector,' the source said."

http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/09/01/rothschild-ireland-idUSL121115920090901



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